Mendip Online

a guide to the city, towns, villages, countryside & attractions
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Parishes, Villages & Hamlets
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Mendip Online
Butleigh Godney
Croscombe
Hemington
Norton St Philip Bridge over Mells River, Great Elm Holcombe Church Cranmore

In the right hand column below we have linked to local websites where information about the different villages in Mendip can be found. The photos are from Somerset in 3D and Wikipedia

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U VW X Y Z

A
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Alder Row - see Selwood  
St James Church, Ashwick Ashwick
About three miles north of Shepton Mallet and seven miles east from Wells, Ashwick has been a civil parish since 1826. The village is the site of Ashwick House, a country house dating from the late 17th century and Grade II listed.
Wikipedia entry
village website
Asney - see Walton  

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Baltonsborough Baltonsborough
The Church of St Dunstan was built in the 15th century. The church's simple Somerset tower is topped by an elaborate ironwork weather vane crafted by the local blacksmith in the 19th century. Every year the Ballsbury Flower Show takes place on the village playing fields.
Wikipedia entry * Photos
Batcombe Batcombe
A quiet Somerset village which is about 7 miles south-east of Shepton Mallet, 9 miles west of Frome, and 23 miles north of Yeovil. Thought to have been established around the year 660 CE following the Saxon invasion of Great Britain.
Wikipedia entry * Photos
village website
St Georges Church, Beckington Beckington
A vibrant, friendly village, attractive architecturally, interesting historically and set in some lovely countryside. Along the side streets, principally Goose Street and Church Street are old stone built workers' and artisans' cottages.
Wikipedia entry * Photos
village website
Benter - see Stratton on the Fosse  
St Mary's Church, Berkley Berkley
The church, which was erected in 1751, is dedicated to St Mary, and includes a recently restored organ. It is a Grade II listed building. Several tombs in the graveyard are listed buildings in their own right:
Wikipedia entry
 
Binegar Binegar
Binegar is a small village located between Shepton Mallet and Chilcompton. The name of the village was Begenhangra, in a charter of 1065, which probably meant the slope where beans are grown. It formed part of the endowment of Wells Cathedral.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Bleadney - see Wookey  
Bradley Cross - see Rodney Stoke  
Buckland Dinham Buckland Dinham
The village is on the side of a hill (known as Buckland Down). It looks out over a vale formed by several small streams, in particular the Buckland Brook, which leads southwards towards Frome. There are signs of prehistoric archaeology.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Butleigh Butleigh
Butleigh Court is noted for its interesting architecture including the tall carved chimney stacks, which are all different. Another interesting landmark is the cedar avenue, just outside the village. There is also a 16th century pub in Butleigh called The Rose and Portcullis.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Burcott Mill Burcott
Burcott Watermill was built for the Bishop of Wells and listed among his estates in the Domesday Book of 1086. The cast iron water wheel is driven by water from the River Axe soon after it leaves Wookey Hole Caves.
Wikipedia entry
 
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Chewton Mendip Church Chewton Mendip
The village has a high number of listed buildings and these are linked from the Wikipedia page. There is a long barrow to the north of the village. The shape of some of the existing fields suggest they are of medieval origin.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Chilcompton Chilcompton
The village began with a cluster of houses around the Manor House and Church. It has always been a favourable place to live, mainly because of springs in the valley, the beginnings of the River Somer. There were at least three mills here using this fresh water.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Clapton - see Ston Easton  
Coleford Coleford
Listed in the Domesday Book as Colford, meaning the hill ford or the coal ford. There are visible remains the canal aqueduct, known locally as the 'Huckyduck', which was abandoned in 1803. The village once had several coal mines as part of the now closed Somerset coalfield.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Coxbridge - see West Bradley  
Coxley Coxley
The village lies on the River Sheppey where the Anglican Christ Church was built in 1839 by Richard Carver. It has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II listed building. It is now home to the Coxley Vineyard.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Cranmore Cranmore
The name comes from Crane Mere, the Lake of the Cranes.It is the base of the East Somerset Railway which plays host to a variety of preserved diesel and steam locomotives. It operates the line between Cranmore railway station and Mendip Vale.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
River Sheppey at Croscombe Croscombe
A unique and interesting little village nestling in a Mendip valley through which flows the River Sheppey. The large Church is of particular interest, having an unusual spire for Somerset, and Jacobean interior woodwork of National renown.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
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Ditcheat Manor Ditcheat
Situated near the River Brue which is crossed by Ansford bridge which dates from 1823. Boulter's Bridge which spans the River Alham is of medieval origin. The parish is close to the Roman Fosse Way. The 17th-century manor house was built by Sir Ralph Hopton.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
River at Dinder Dinder
The river Sheppey runs alongside the main street of the village. Home to the creators of Baby Sham, and Brothers Pear Cider. The calendar of events attract crowds from all over the UK.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Tithe Barn, Manor Farm, Doulting Doulting
The village dates from the 8th century when King Ine of Wessex gave the local estate to Glastonbury Abbey after his nephew St Aldhelm died in the village. In his honour the local spring is called St Aldhelm's Well. The tithe barn dates from the 15th century.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Downhead Church Downhead
A village and civil parish which includes the medieval settlement of Tadhill. It is close to the Asham Wood which is the largest and most diverse of the ancient semi-natural woods in the Mendip Hills. There are a range of unusual flora and fauna.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Dulcote Dulcote
Home to a large limestone quarry. Twinhills Woods and Meadows south of Dulcote is a 21.2 hectare (52.4 acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
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East End - see Stoke St Michael  
East Lydford - see Lydford on Fosse  
East Pennard

East Pennard
The estate wasgranted by King Edred to a nun of Wilton and she transferred it to Glastonbury Abbey which retained it until 1539. The church,dates from the 14th century.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos

 
East Woodlands - see Selwood  
Easton Easton
Easton is believed to mean 'The enclosure by the water' from the Old English eas and tun. The church of St Paul in Easton dates from 1843. It is a Grade II listed building.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Emborough Pond Emborough
Emborough is close to the Emborough Quarries Site of Special Scientific Interest. Emborough Pond (also known as Lechmere Water) is a 10-acre lake used for Carp angling.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Evercreech church Evercreech
The village was recorded as Evrecriz in the Domesday Book of 1086. Small Down Knoll is a Bronze Age hill fort above the village. Cutterne Mill is an old watermill which is now being used for electricity generation.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
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Farleigh Hungerford Farleigh Hungerford
Within this village are the notable ruins of Farleigh Hungerford Castle, which played a significant part in the English Civil War. Evidence has also been found of occupation during Roman times; the foundations of a villa were excavated in a field just north west of the castle in 1822.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Lavender field, Faulkland

Faulkland
On the village green in Faulkland and at several other sites throughout the village there are standing stones of unknown origin. Between two of the stones are the 16th or 17th-century village stocks. Home to Somerset Lavender.
Wikipedia entry

 
Fosse - see Stoke St Michael  
Foxcote - see Hemington  
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Godney Godney
Set amongst the willows, waterways and wildlife of the Somerset Levels, Godney (God's Isle) is a thriving and innovative community with events that include the spring Duck Races and autumn Raft Races, and the celebrated fancy dress Boxing Day Pram Race.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Bridge over river at Great Elm Great Elm
The landscape surrounding the village is very beautiful, with rolling arable landscape to the north and the cleft of Vallis Vale to the south, where the Mells Stream swells to provide the village pond. There are many lovely walks in the Vallis Vale.
Wikipedia entry
village website
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Hardington - see Hemington  
Hemington Hemington
The parish includes, Hardington, Faulkland and Foxcote. On the village green in Faulkland and at several other sites throughout the village there are standing stones of unknown origin. Between two of the stones are the 16th or 17th-century village stocks.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Henton - see Wookey  
Hinton Charterhouse Hinton Charterhouse
The chapter house with library and dovecote above, of the former Carthusian Hinton Priory dates from 1232 and is a Grade I listed building. The priory was founded in 1232 by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, who also founded Lacock Abbey.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Holcombe Church Holcombe
The original medieval village was buried at the time of the plague and the old parish church, which survives, is surrounded by the mounds that bear testimony to this burial. It is suggested that the rhyme 'Ring a Ring o' Roses' began there as a result.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Hornblotton - see West Bradley  
Horrington Horrington
A collection of three small villages (South Horrington, East Horrington and West Horrington) in the parish of St Cuthbert Out. The nearby Maesbury Railway Cutting exposes strata of early Carboniferous (Courceyan) age.
Wikipedia entry
 
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Kilmersdon Kilmersdon
Kilmersdon is said to be the "home" of the Jack and Jill nursery rhyme, the fabled hill being recently restored as part of a local Millennium scheme. The area has the remains of many disused coal mines which were part of the Somerset coalfield.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
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Lamyatt Lamyatt
One of the longest continuously inhabited settlements in Britain it is now a thriving community made up of people from all walks of life. A square Roman-period Celtic temple built in the late 200s, is situated a mile north-west of the parish on the summit of Lamyatt Beacon.
Wikipedia entry
village website
Laverton - see Lullington  
Leigh on Mendip Leigh on Mendip
The name of this village is pronounced lye or lie rather than lee, and probably comes from the Old English meaning grove or glade.The estate formed part of the manor of Mells and was held by Glastonbury Abbey until the dissolution of the monasteries.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Litton Litton
Litton was listed in the Domesday Book as Litune, meaning 'The small enclosure' from the Old English lyt and tun.The shape of some of the existing fields suggest they are of medieval origin.
Wikipedia entry
 
Lottisham - see West Bradley  
Lower Milton - see Wookey  
Lullington Lullington
A village and civil parish just across the Mells River from Beckington. The parish includes the hamlet of Laverton, where the Church of St. Mary dates from the 11th century.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Lydford-on-Fosse Lydford-on-Fosse
A village and civil parish that includes the hamlet of East Lydford. Lydford-on-Fosse straddles the Fosse Way, an ancient Roman road which linked the cities of Lincoln and Exeter. The current road bridge over the River Brue was built in the 17th century.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
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Meare Fish House Meare
Meare is a marshland village in typical Somerset "rhyne" country, standing on the site of pre-historic lake dwellings. A 14thC fish house was once the abode of Glastonbury Abbey fishermen. The Manor Farmhouse was the summer residence of the Abbots.
Wikipedia entry * Photos
 
Mells

Mells
Mells is a village and civil parish and includes the village of Vobster. Mells Manor was purportedly procured by Jack Horner upon discovering the deed in a pie given to him to carry to London by Richard Whiting, the last Abbot of Glastonbury.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos

village website
Midway - see Stoke St Michael  
no image available Milton Clevedon
An early Iron Age earthwork, probably a stock enclosure but known as the Castle, occupies a spur of Creech Hill overlooking the River Alham valley. The site includes a possible barrow on the west.
Wikipedia entry
 
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Nettlebridge - see Stratton on the Fosse  
North Wootton North Wootton
A small village on the River Redlake and the Monarch's Way long-distance footpath. The name Wootton means the settlement in or by a wood. The North being added in the 20th century to distinguish it from Wootton Courtenay.
Wikipedia entry
 
Norton St Philip Norton St Philip
The George Inn, one of a number of establishments that claims to be Britain’s oldest tavern, is located in the centre of the village. It was built in the 14th or 15th century as a wool store.
More Info * Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Nunney Castle Nunney
The tourist attractions are the ruins of Nunney Castle, an historic church, and ducks wandering the streets near the river. In 2007 the BBC asked whether "the prettiest village in England" is a place where we can learn "how to mend our broken society".
Wikipedia entry
* Photos * John at Nunney
village website
Nyland - see Rodney Stoke  
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Pilton Barn Pilton
According to legend Pilton (or Pooltown) is where Joseph of Arimathea landed in Britain in the 1st century. Pilton still has a Grade I listed Norman church, a grade II listed Manor house and a grade I Tithe barn.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
no image available Polsham (also spelled Poulsham)
The village is split into two parts with half of the village on the A39 road, which includes a pub, and half of the village around 600 yards down a country lane.
Wikipedia entry
 
Priddy Priddy
The village lies in a small hollow near the summit of the Mendip range of hills,and has evidence of occupation since neolithic times. There are caves beneath the village. It is the venue for the annual Folk Festival and Sheep Fair, which has been held since 1348.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Pylle Church Pylle
A village and civil parish which includes the hamlet of Street on the Fosse. Pylle Manor probably dates from the 17th century, with an 18th-century staircase, and is also listed as a Grade II* building.The Church was rebuilt in 1868 but a 15th-century tower remains.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
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Rodden - see Selwood  
Rode Church Rode
Formerly a market town, Rode rose to prominence as a trading centre on the ceremonial borders of Wiltshire and Somerset. There used to be several mills in the village, one of which has now been converted into The Mill pub.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Rodney Stoke Rodney Stoke
A small village and civil parish that includes the hamlets of Nyland and Bradley Cross. Situated within an area of high biodiversity supporting local rare species of plants and animal life. Close is Westbury Camp, the remains of an Iron Age enclosed settlement.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
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East Woodlands Selwood
Used to be a village but is now part of the suburbs of Frome. It is a civil parish that includes the villages of East and West Woodlands, Rodden and the hamlet of Alder Row.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
no image available Sharpham
The Sharpham Park estate produces organic foods. A restoration project is underway. It involves restoring a Bronze Age trackway and a duck decoy pond that is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. Nearby is the Sharpham Moor Plot Site of Special Scientific Interest.
Wikipedia entry
 
Stoke St Michael

Stoke St Michael
The parish includes the hamlets of Fosse, Midway, Three Ashes, Withybrook and East End. It is set in the characteristic East Mendip landscape of lush pasture, streams, swallets, wooded valleys and quarries.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos

village website
Ston Easton Church Ston Easton
The village is situated on the high road from Bristol to Wells and the parish includes the hamlet of Clapton. The village has a parish church, a brand-new village hall, a pre-school, a nursing home and a luxury hotel.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Downside Abbey Stratton on the Fosse
A village and civil parish including the hamlets of Benter and Nettlebridge. The village is dominated by the fine neo-Gothic abbey church of St Gregory The Great, Downside Abbey with its166ft (55m) square "Somerset" tower, the large bell of which is known as "Great Bede".
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Street on the Fosse - see Pylle  
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Tadhill - see Downhead  
no image available Tellisford
A village and civil parish that includes the village of Woolverton.There is a weir, and an Environment Agency monitoring station on the River Frome in the village. The bridge, which dates from the 17th century, is a Grade II listed building.
Wikipedia entry
 
Three Ashes- see Stoke St Michael  
Trudoxhill Trudoxhill
Trudoxhill is a small village situated just off the A361 between Frome and Shepton Mallet..South of the village Postlebury Wood is a large and relatively undisturbed woodland with the first records of the woodland being from documents dated 1182
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
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Upper Milton - see Wookey  
Upton Noble Church Upton Noble
The Church of St Mary Magdalene dates from the 12th century and is a Grade II* listed building. The church was a chapelry to Batcombe.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
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Vobster.- see Mells  
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Walton Windmill Walton
Walton is a village and parish, on the Polden Hills, and includes the hamlet of Asney. Walton windmill was described as "new-erected" in 1741. It was worked until 1906 and is now a private residence.
Wikipedia entry
 
Wanstrow Church Wanstrow
Wanstrow is a village and civil parish which includes the village of Cloford. Cloford Quarry and Leighton Road Cutting provide exposure of early Jurassic limestones, of Lower Lias age. The manor house was built in the 17th century and is a Grade II listed building.
Wikipedia entry * Photos
 
West Bradley Church West Bradley
A village and civil parish that includes the hamlets of Hornblotton and Lottisham.The village is on the Monarch's Way long-distance footpath. The Court Barn was built in the 15th century as a Tithe barn for Glastonbury Abbey, and was restored in the early 20th century.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
West Pennard Church West Pennard
A village and civil parish east of Glastonbury which includes the hamlets of Coxbridge and Woodlands. West Pennard Court Barn dates from the 15th-century barn. It was built as a Tithe Barn for the abbey and is now owned by the National Trust.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
Village Website
West Woodlands - see Selwood  
Westhay Moor Westhay
Westhay is a marshland village on the River Brue in typical Somerset "Rhineland" country, standing on the site of pre-historic lake dwellings. Nearby are Westhay Moor and Westhay Heath, which are both Sites of Special Scientific Interest.
Wikipedia entry
 
Westbury-sub-Mendip Church Westbury-sub-Mendip
On the southern slopes of the Mendip Hills. The church of St Lawrence was given to the canons of Bruton Priory by Robert, Bishop of Bath, in the 12th century. It is a Grade II listed building. Westbury-sub-Mendip won the title of Somerset Village of the Year 2006.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
village website
Manor Farm Gatehouse, Whatley Whatley
The gatehouse at Manor farm was built around 1500 and is a Grade I listed building. Chantry Park is Grade II listed: The Chantry is a neoclassical villa built c.1825.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Witham Friary Witham Friary
Located in the Cranborne Chase and West Wiltshire Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the ancient Forest of Selwood. The remains of the Carthusian House is a scheduled ancient monument.
Wikipedia entry
* Photos
 
Withybrook - see Stoke St Michael  
Woodlands - see West Pennard  
Wookey Hole Church Wookey Hole
A village and civil parish on the River Axe It is perhaps best known today for the nearby Wookey Hole Caves. The parish includes the village of Henton and the nearby hamlets of Yarley and Bleadney where the River Axe, travels the length of the village.
Wikipedia entry
village website
Woolverton - see Tellisford  
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Yarley - see Wookey  
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